Mental Health Therapy Costs and Plans

Our mental health services are truly affordable on any budget!

Mental Health Therapy Costs and Plans

Our mental health services are truly affordable on any budget!

A multicultural trio laughing

Associate Rates

Without insurance, the initial session typically costs $75 and followup sessions cost $65.

Counselor Rates

Without insurance, the initial session typically costs $125 and followup sessions cost $95.

Psychologist Rates

Without insurance, the initial session typically costs $175 and followup sessions cost $125. Testing costs differ depending on what is ordered.

Psychiatrist Rates

Without insurance, the initial session typically costs $200 and followup sessions cost $100.

What health insurance plans do you take?

At NewPath, many of our mental health counselors are “in-network” with government and commercial insurance companies; however, not all of our providers are in-network, but we can give you a superbill receipt after your sessions to file with your insurance company. This will allow you to use your out-of-network benefits.

Health insurances that at least one of our therapists accepts:

  • Aetna
  • Amerigroup
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Beacon Health Options
  • Superior Health (Cenpatico)
  • Cigna
  • CMS Medicare
  • Community Health Choice
  • Compsych
  • Interface EAP
  • Magellan
  • Medicare
  • Molina
  • Multiplan
  • TCHP
  • TMHP
  • Triwest
  • UMR
  • United Health Care

It is important to look at the pros and cons of using your insurance - be informed!

Pro: Reduce your out-of-pocket costs

Obviously, using your health insurance CAN help you to cut down on the out-of-pocket expenses of mental health services for you and your family. Depending on your plan and if your therapist is in your insurance network, your copays can range from $0 – $60 per session. You already pay monthly premiums, and it makes sense to want to save where you can.

Con: "Medical necessity"

You may or may not know that health insurance companies like to cut costs any way that they can. The first way is to require proof that services are “medically necessary” for you. For this to happen, your therapist is required to give you a mental health diagnosis that you qualify for, and this goes into your permanent medical record. The insurance company also can request records to confirm that your conversations in sessions are related to your diagnosis.

Couples Counseling – Insurance companies will tell you that this type of counseling is covered. Still, they do not tell you that it is technically only covering one person and their diagnosis. To make this fit the “medically necessary” model, the other partner is merely attending the sessions to discuss the other partner’s diagnosis that is filing insurance. This puts a permanent medical record on the one partner in the relationship.

Con: Loss of confidentiality and privacy

Also, insurance companies can request copies of your clinical notes, treatment plans, and evaluations. Since they are paying the bill, you release this information voluntarily to them. Let’s not forget that life insurance, disability insurance, and some job applications are allowed access to your medical records.

Con: Limitation of treatment

Some health insurance companies limit the number of sessions you are allowed and limit the time of your sessions with your therapist. Even if there are no limits, they will often ask for consultations with your therapist to determine if you still have a medical necessity to be in therapy.

Counselor talks to his patient on a couch in his office

Consensus

Ultimately, deciding whether or not to use your health insurance is a matter of what is most important to you personally. If savings are at the top of your list of important factors for getting the mental health services that you need, then using your insurance is a good fit; however, if confidentiality, privacy, and freedom from limitations that can keep you from the best care are most valued by you, then self-pay is the best option. The choice is always yours!